“I think there’s a duty to entertain": Dominic from Luton interview below.

Found Objects 30/04/2011

Posted: April 30th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: aggregation, contemporary art | No Comments »

Another week, another round-up of favourite links to the world wide web. Please enjoy:

  • Apparently there was a big state occasion here in Britain yesterday. Well, I doubt it was anything like as good as this footage of the funeral of Nam June Paik in Korea (via @ubuweb).
  • Better late than never, here’s a link to the Time Out interview with still missing Ai Weiwei. His relationship status with the Chinese government appears to be quite ‘complicated’ (via Eyeteeth blog).
  • “If you’re going to steal something, you know, you go to the bank,” says Richard Prince in a 1992 conversation published this week on photography blog American Suburb X. Last month a US Court found the re-photographer in breach of copyright laws.
  • This piece on Eric Ravilious was of local interest to me, since the 20th century painter lived and worked in East Sussex. But his extreme good cheer as described by Peter Laity in the Guardian should appeal to all.
  • On Bad at Sports, Terri Griffith blogs in favour of Google Art Project and museum apps and seems resigned she will never make it to the Uffizi.
  • Find out what links Tiger Woods to Tate in an astute and amusing piece by Ben Street for Art21.
  • German artist Hans-Peter Feldman wants us to understand just how much money he’s won in the Hugo Boss Prize. The resulting show at Guggenheim is certainly to the point (The New York Times).
  • Cey Adams appears to be the Peter Saville of hip hop and his 4 minute interview on the MoMA blog is well worth a watch.
  • Despite not being about art, there’s so much in this fascinating piece about time and consciousness that I don’t know where to begin recommending it: an in-depth interview with neuroscientist David Eagleman in the New Yorker.
  • Nothing-to-do-with-art-but-interesting-all-the-same Part 2: the Atlantic publishes two global maps which show the earnings of top athletes. They make bankers look like church mice.



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