Browsing Category: abstract painting

  • Brent Wadden, Alignment #53 (2015)

    There’s a great warmth that comes from the ragged, woolly presence of Brent Wadden’s large (two by two and a half metres) woven work. You might even say its tactile qualities are cosy. But the design is less comfortable: irregular, patched together in haste, an austere black and white. He doesn’t use much technology, but …

    October 8, 2015
  • Interview: Glenn Ligon

    As if to demonstrate the centre cannot hold, debates around canonical art have shaken down to the East Midlands from a point of origin in New York’s Bronx. Nottingham Contemporary hosts a curatorial project by US artist Glenn Ligon. Thanks to a creative hang, the regional gallery has set up dialogues between some of the …

    May 17, 2015
  • Jakob Dahlgren, Peinture abstraite (2001 – present)

    Artists often go too far. Sometimes it can seem that any art worth its salt has to do just that, to show some form of excess, to do something inordinately repetitive, or of course skilled. Jakob Dahlgren’s thirteen year-long durational project will have many scratching their heads, asking what is the point? But to provoke …

    April 9, 2014
  • Sean Scully, Stare (1984)

    Is the title of this Sean Scully work an imperative? I only ask because gallery visitors can do little else when confronted with this three-panelled masterpiece from the 1980s. So we stare . . . but whatever we seek, paint is all we might find. Bands of off-white and off-black, inspired by bleached bone and …

    November 20, 2013
  • Bill Henderson, Funky Black and Catch Me, 1978

    This painting reaches back through the years to a teenage in the 80s. This spiky pattern would have bowled me over and indeed still does. Perhaps I once had a duvet cover like it. What makes Henderson’s painting, dare it be said, boyish are the preponderance of dynamic angles and bold colours, complete with moody …

    December 5, 2012
  • John Cage, River Rocks and Smoke 4/11/90 No.1

    The universe, it seems, has good taste. Here is a painting it did. Or rather, here is a painting John Cage allowed to happen, letting the I-Ching direct his brushstrokes if true to form. Observe the wispy sfmuato effect, created by students with burning straw. Look at that delicate use of colour and the almost …

    May 6, 2011