Browsing Category: contemporary sculpture

  • Damien Hirst, Lapdancer (2006)

    If needing just one word to sum up Damien Hirst at Tate Modern, you might resort to some made up slang invented for a work of dystopian fiction. The violence of his killed and pickled animals is horrorshow, as is the vitrine pictured. Real horrorshow, the ultimate accolade for gang member Alex in A Clockwork …

    April 8, 2012
  • FOUND, Cybraphon (2009)

    By writing this I am making Cybraphon happy and by reading this you are making me happy. Here’s what criticismism has in common with an autonomous emotional robot. FOUND collective’s sculpture tracks hits to its own website and obsesses over its stats and indeed, like most bloggers, that is activity I can all too easily …

    April 28, 2011
  • Leo Fitzmaurice, Arcadia (2007)

    This sign is at once ironic, illusory and completely superfluous. So it ticks a lot of boxes to signal that it really just labels itself. Arcadia is after all the name of this artwork. More irony comes from the introduction of roadside signage into such a wild, mythical realm. A nearby motorway would kill the …

    April 7, 2011
  • Susan Hiller, Lucidity and Intuition: Homage to Gertrude Stein, 2011

    What could be more uncanny than neat piles of books actually underneath a desk, if not neat piles of books on a decidedly uncanny subject? In this case, automatic writing. For Gertrude Stein, to whom this sculpture is intended as a homage, the books represent a return of the repressed. The writer went from experimenting …

    February 4, 2011
  • Rory Macbeth, The Wanderer by Franz Kafka, 2011

    Looking at art and reading can seem poles apart. Galleries are public spaces in which we move from one room to another. Reading is usually sedentary and usually in some way private. But The Wanderer by Franz Kafka, by Rory Macbeth, suggests otherwise. The title promises a mobile activity, while the reading which took place …

    February 1, 2011
  • Urs Fischer, Untitled (2000)

    These two mismatched halves, screwed together and suspended out of reach, bring to mind both the promise and the pitfalls of romantic love. First there is the seedy, fruitful aspect of these two fruits pushed together. But then there are the unavoidable differences as they find themselves hung out to dry in a marriage from …

    January 27, 2011
  • Sean Lynch, DeLorean Progress Report, 2009-10

    Tooling presses once used to manufacture a dream sports car of the 1980s are now to be found 18m below sea level, a habitation for crabs, sea cucumbers and a lobster. This is not a metaphor. A metaphor would be the 1981 commercial for the DeLorean DMC-12 which showed the car by the ocean with …

    January 25, 2011
  • Damien Hirst, Let’s Eat Outdoors Today (1990-91)

    One way to define contemporary art may be to include anything which provokes the reaction: “That’s not art!” And Damien Hirst is certainly no stranger to this reaction. But the genius of this previously unseen work is that when it asks, ‘Why can’t this be art?’ as it surely does, the immediate response is it …

    January 20, 2011
  • Ben Washington, I Will Eat This Sleepy Town (installation detail), 2011

    For all the world you expect this image to move. It is a back lit screen with a casing as substantial as a cathode ray tube. We have come to expect computerised tablets to sing and dance, why not this? But no matter how long you watch, the piece is static. The TVs in the …

    January 13, 2011
  • Rostan Tavasiev, Ghost (2008)

    There is a highlight of the current show at Grey Area. That word is used because the rest of the works are in darkness. Visitors are provided with torches. A lightbulb forms part of Tavasiev’s sculpture. So what it seems to illuminate is the arbitrary way we give a personality to the spirit of the …

    December 5, 2010