Browsing Category: installation art

  • Miquel Navarro, Wall City (1995-2000)

    It is a quirk of perception that we read this as a city. On the face of it, most of Navarro’s work is comprised of regimented obelisks. So it’s not like any city you or I might live in. There’s no chaos, no movement and no colour. The columns are as grave as tombstones in a …

    October 27, 2014
  • Wang Yuyang, Breathing Books (2014)

    “I like the traditional Chinese philosophy,” says Wang Yuyang, “Because it talks about the relationship between 1 and 0, on and off, black and white, something and nothing…” You have to imagine that the thirtysomething artist would also like the branch of post-structuralist theory known, confusingly, as deconstruction. If deconstruction itself has been sparked into …

    October 8, 2014
  • Alan Magee, Return to glory (2014)

    Two disks grace the gallery. One sits on the floor. One hangs on the wall. Looking closer, their outer rims can be identified as hula hoops. But there will be no gyrating here today. Both hoops have been measured up for a plasterboard inner, and worked over with filler to produce an artwork. So that …

    September 10, 2014
  • Simon Lewandowski, 100 Things With Handles (2008)

    When confronted with a work of contemporary art, it is common to look for a handle. But it is not always easy to get to grips with an abstract sculpture or an assemblage. You could go to the press release. After all, that’s what a reviewer will do. But then every so often a piece …

    August 19, 2014
  • Photodiary: Franz West at The Hepworth Wakefield

    This was my first visit to The Hepworth and I was blown away by a) the David Chipperfield building and b) the setting by the River Calder. Here’s a view from one to the other. We were here for the biggest every show at the gallery and the UK’s first major survey of work by Franz …

    June 24, 2014
  • Photodiary: Whitstable Biennale 2014

    Last Saturday I spent eight or so intense hours hot footing it around a coastal town in South East England in search of the many artworks which make up Whitstable Biennale. The coach dropped us at the Horsebridge Arts Centre, in which could be seen a wry excavation of 35-year-old television drama ,Sapphire and Steel, in …

    June 8, 2014
  • Charlie Billingham, Port Tack (2013)

    A market in ancient Greece is distinguishable from the art market, but by less than you might think. In both you find the free circulation of ideas along with goods and services. Like any auction house, the agora was a place of assembly. It had a political role as much as a commercial one and …

    January 16, 2014
  • The finite charms of the Chapman brothers

    In a book you can be fairly sure the Chapmans have read, A Thirst for Annihilation, philosopher Nick Land reports on the encounter between American GIs and the mass graves of the Nazi death camps. If memory serves me right, many of the liberators, upon encountering piles of unburied bodies, said they experienced a rush-like …

    December 17, 2013
  • Tom Dale, Department of the Interior (2012)

    While there may be plenty of government departments in castles all around the world, we are lucky in Britain to broadly avoid that particular Kafkaesque motif. And yet the darkness of a homegrown bouncy castle made of leather, with its many turrets, and its relentless air pump, is every bit as oppressive as the Czech …

    November 14, 2013
  • Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Celebration? Realife, 1972-2000

    Throwing a party, like making art, is one of those activities we can attend to when all of our most basic needs have been satisfied. Food, shelter, art – that is surely the order. But if we are to suppose that ancient people ever let their hair down, who would decorate the cave? With a …

    February 11, 2013