Browsing Category: war art

  • Dinh Q Lê, The Farmers and the Helicopters (2006)

    War is a game for boys of all ages. So if that’s your violent gender you might especially enjoy this montage of vintage film in which helicopter gunships rain deafening misery on the Vietnamese. Dinh Q Lê’s film begins gently with innocuous footage of dragonflies and some peasant wisdom about determining the weather from their flight patterns. …

    October 11, 2014
  • Stanley Spencer, Filling Tea Urns, 1927

    It may have been said, but a full century before the meme took off, Stanley Spencer painted works which embodied the suggestion we should ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’. Here you see orderlies in a military hospital who, instead of getting depressed or suicidal about the horrors of war, are busy making tea. But there …

    February 23, 2014
  • Steve McQueen, Queen and Country (2003-08)

    In terms of medium, Steve McQueen is in unusual territory with his celebrated philatelical artwork Queen and Country. Just don’t expect to see any of this piece come through your letterbox. 179 sheets of stamps now occupy a large filing cabinet at Imperial War Museum North. Visitors can pull out trays and encounter, one by …

    October 21, 2013
  • Mariele Neudecker, Psychopomp (Hercules Missile Graphite Rubbings 1&2) (2010/11)

    Under normal circumstances the end of a world war might be cause for reflection. And indeed, each November we have institutionalised mourning at an almost mandatory level. But the cold war is different. Lives were only lost in countries the US and the USSR should never have been in. Remote peoples were armed and set …

    May 25, 2013
  • James Bridle, Under the Shadow of the Drone (2013)

    It is one of the most frightening scenarios you can imagine: up to six armed drone aircraft circling your neighbourhood, preparing to strike and strike they do. Numbers are what surprised me most from reading James Bridle’s blog about unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones. If six Reapers above your village doesn’t amount to terrorism, nothing …

    May 21, 2013
  • Mary Kelly and Ray Barrie, Habitus, 2010

    According to a 2003 book, there were 3.6 million Anderson Shelters in use during WWII. They must have been a common sight, as common as catching a glimpse of your parents having sex. Mary Kelly, b.1941, has spoken of the War as a political ‘primal scene‘ for people of her generation. And so into this …

    February 23, 2011
  • Interview: Gerald Laing

    Sixties Pop Art had a “culpable banality” and Andy Warhol’s sculpture of Brillo boxes was a “real travesty”, according to one of the movement’s pioneers, Gerald Laing. The Scottish artist features heavily in a new show at Wolverhampton Art Gallery, in which Pop Art finds politics. Many of the works are from the past ten …

    June 3, 2010