• The faux pas of primitivism

    “Lascaux 170”by Ma Boîte à Image is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 In post war France, prehistoric art got people talking. At least it got intellectuals talking, but this being France we can imagine that the zone of interest was widespread. The basis for this post, about primitivism in the years following the Second World …

    July 16, 2019
  • How authentic is cave painting?

    I have been reading a correspondence between Spanish academic José Díaz Cuyás and Dean MacCannell. MacCannell is a former soixante-huitard who lost faith in a 1960s style Revolution. But as he observes, some fifty years later: “‘The revolution’ and especially the romantic figure of the revolutionary is a myth that effectively disables the left today.” …

    July 11, 2019
  • Lascaux: an intangible monument

    I’ve been reading an essay by Rosemary J Coombe about world heritage in an age of neoliberal politics. Whereas a monolithic state may once have strived to preserve monumental artefacts and artworks of supposed universal appeal, we now have a web of agencies both within and outside of government that connect around artefacts that may …

    July 4, 2019
  • How French is Lascaux?

    In a hypothetical word association game, I predict that food, the Eiffel Tower and the Mona Lisa would all get a mention long before Lascaux. The cave at Montignac seems French only insofar as a specimen of moon rock appears to be American. Today I was reading about the heritage industry and wondering just who …

    June 27, 2019
  • Review: Bruno Latour, We Have Never Been Modern (1991)

    Although Latour’s contentious book is a mere 145 pages long (in fact he calls it an essay), the notion that, after one reading, this fledgling researcher is qualified to review this for you feels like hubris. However, We Have Never Been Modern reads like a manifesto and, as such, the pages call for a response. …

    June 13, 2018
  • General Data Protection Regulation: GDPR

    Just a note to prompt you to unsubscribe if you no longer want to get updates from my site. I cannot ask you to opt in because my subscriber list is lost in the ether somewhere. I genuinely can’t find it. Apologies…

    May 22, 2018
  • A neanderthal in agnès b.

    Last week I visited the Neandertal exhibition at the Musée de l’Homme in Paris. The show was instructive and lively. And reasonably busy, for a Friday morning. There is clearly public interest in our nearest prehistorical kindred. Just why this should be, I’ll hazard a guess at the end of this post. There wasn’t too …

    April 24, 2018
  • L’abbé Breuil and Bisonte cigarettes

    Henri Breuil (1877-1961) has been called the father of prehistory. Little known in the UK, he should really take a place alongside Freud, Darwin and Marx as one of the scientists who sent shockwaves through 20th century thought; he changed the way we see our place in the world for good. Breuil was a cleric, …

    April 19, 2018
  • Q&A: Anna Jaxe

    As a Brighton-based blogger, criticismism is underpaid when compared to millionaire video blogging neighbours like Zoella or PewDiePie. So I’ve been quite curious about the format, and keen to see if the moving selfie can work for art. Well, the good news is that it can. As demonstrated ably by Anna Jaxe, whose Creoddity channel …

    September 13, 2017
  • Phil Collins, dűnya dinlemiyor (2005)

    Dűnya dinlemiyor is Turkish for The World Won’t Listen, which as you may know is a 1987 compilation album by The Smiths. At the time of release, the world was listening. The album was a chart hit. And that was just in the UK. As this work by artist Phil Collins reveals, the sentiment and …

    August 8, 2017